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A glimpse behind the scenes at 23 Southwick Square. Read our blog to find out more about the daily running of Linden Tree Flowers, meet the team and find out some top tips on how to best care for your plants and flowers at home.

Linden Tree Flowers Blog - Behind The Scenes in a Flower Shop

A glimpse behind the scenes at 23 Southwick Square. Read our blog to find out more about the daily running of Linden Tree Flowers, meet the team and find out some top tips on how to best care for your plants and flowers at home.


24/02/19 - How to Care for your Cut Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas are one of our all-time favourite flowers. They are the total show-offs of the flower world and never fail to steal the show when used in a bouquet or arrangement. Ever popular in bridal bouquets and available in a fantastic range of colours, particularly towards the end of the summer, they can, however, be a little temperamental and are prone to going a bit floppy if not treated just so. Below we have put together a few tips on how to best care for your cut Hydrangeas to keep them looking beautiful for as long as possible.

  1. Use flower food.
    All of our bouquets are delivered with flower food which should be added to the water you place your flowers in. The flower food ensures that the bloom has all that it needs to extend it’s vase life. Make sure you use the correct dosage. According to Chrysal, who provide our flower food, adding their Universal product to water can help your flowers to last up to 60% longer.

  2. Ensure your flowers have enough water.
    Seems obvious doesn’t it? But Hydrangeas are an extremely thirsty flower so do keep an eye on the water level in your vase and they can drink it all up much quicker than you may expect!

  3. Cut Stems Correctly.
    You may have been told in the past that cutting stems at a 45 degree angle is ideal for cut flowers. The Hydrangea is no exception to this. As well as cutting at an angle, it is also advisable to cut directly up the stem, effectively splitting the bottom of it in two. Both of these techniques increases the amount of surface area exposed to the water, enabling the stem to suck up more water.

  4. Dunk them!
    If disaster strikes and your Hydrangea collapses in on itself all may not be lost. The Hydrangea has many thin petals, and it is possible to re-hydrate the flower via the petals as well as the stem. Simply dunk the entire head of the flower into clean water and leave for a few minutes. Take the flower out, re-cut the stem as outlined about and leave overnight. It may not seem plausible at the time but the flower should plump back up to it’s former glory after a few hours…be patient!

  5. Find the right spot.
    As with all cut flowers, it’s inadvisable to display Hydrangea in direct sunlight, in a draft or in a an area which is particularly warm, such as above a heater or radiator. All of these conditions will increase the rate of transpiration and may lead to the flower becoming dehydrated.

What’s not to love?

What’s not to love?

An example of Hydrangea which was revived after a good dunking.

An example of Hydrangea which was revived after a good dunking.

Cutting up the stem as well as across at a 45 degree angle.

Cutting up the stem as well as across at a 45 degree angle.

Lindsay Skene